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war between the states

southeast-auto-manufacturingFort Sumter was not hurled by Union soldiers serving under Major Robert Anderson across Charleston Harbor into inchoate cannon balls still in the cannons of Citadel-manned troops under the command of Confederate Brigadier General P.G.T. Beauregard located at Forts Johnson and Moultrie on James and Sullivan’s Islands, respectively, in South Carolina.

No, the War Between the States begun at 4:30 a.m. on April 12, 1861 was initiated by Southern aggression, despite the appellation for the Civil War preferred by Lost Causers as, the War of Northern Aggression.

But the war that has been waged against the eleven states that seceded and several other south of the Mason-Dixon line at least since five minutes after its native son, yet still a Democrat, Bill Clinton evacuated the White House just after High Noon on January 20, 2001, has been one born of Northern and West Coast aggression. What on God’s Green Earth is this South Carolina Gamecock presently roosted atop Stone Mountain of Georgia talking about?

The latest battle in the Yankees’ aka Liberal Democrats’ unrelenting attack against Southern voters refusing to give them electoral votes for Obamacare, higher energy and food prices and appeasement of Islamist terrorists was initiated by the Washington Post in the wee hours of October 7, 2014 with the following salvo, i.e. Why the South is the worst place to live in the U.S. – in 10 charts.

In his treasonous diatribe, a Wonkblog spy operating as Roberto A. Ferdman (notice the lack of creativity in the creation of aliases?) constructs ten supposed Southern strawmen and proceeds to destroy them with exaggerations, false assumptions, hasty generalizations, false dichotomies, post hoc and ad hoc non-arguments, reverse burdens of proof, non sequiturs and begged questions. Continue reading

Winfield_Scott,_ca._War_of_1812

Two hundred and thirty-eight years ago yesterday, the Continental Congress approved the text of the Declaration of Independence to formalize their unanimous vote of July 2, 1776 to declare independence from, and thus wage war against, the British Empire. Shots fired at Lexington, Concord and Bunker and Breed’s Hills had already been heard around the world in 1775 announcing the waging of the then undeclared war. It would be weeks after that first Fourth of July before many signatures other than John Hancock’s adorned later versions of the Declaration, six years before the British Army would surrender at Yorktown and eight before the Treaty of Paris officially ended the American Revolutionary War, proper.

But had actual independence truly been attained even when the ink was dry on that 1783 treaty or even by the time the Constitution of the United States was ratified in 1789? Not if you asked U.S. Navy sailors impressed by British officers into Her Majesty’s Service at sea or exporters, from harbors on the Great Lakes or out of Charleston, South Carolina, unable to market their wares abroad thanks to that same navy flying the Union Jack.

Thus, the War of 1812 and the entry into the American bloodstream of Winfield Scott, a son of Virginia, but first and foremost an American, whose first foray into the history books was in the struggle to secure the Niagara River and thus Lakes Ontario and Erie from British control. Thwarted by inept superiors at Queenston in October of 1812, then Colonel Scott’s ingenious plan to secure Fort George was allowed to go forward in May of 2013. Then on July 5, 1814 he took Chippawa, and later that month Lundy’s Lane, to secure the river and Upper New York independent of all but the will of Americans.

Partially inspired by his exploits, Dolly and President James Madison would remain calm, after the same inept commanders that first thwarted Scott allowed Washington City to be taken and the U.S. Capitol and White (then President’s) House burned, to, together with newly appointed Secretary of War James Monroe unleash General Andrew Jackson and others to drive the enemy from the shores of the Land of the Free and the Home of the Brave with only a Star-Spangled Banner flying above it.

Fast forward to the Halls of Montezuma in September of 1847 and witness now General Scott accept the formal surrender of Mexico in Mexico City and the completion of a manifest destiny of Liberty from the Atlantic sea to the Pacific sea. By the time war broke out between the states between those shining seas, Scott was deemed too old to command Union forces against the fellow Virginian, Robert E. Lee, whom he failed to persuade to eschew the Confederacy. But his last great legacy to secure true independence for all, even from slavery, was his “Anaconda Plan” that Commander in Chief Abraham Lincoln approved to take control of all harbors and major water ways from the Chesapeake; Outer North Carolina bank;, Port Royal in South Carolina; Pensacola, Florida; Mobile, Alabama; and to New Orleans and all points in between.

God bless Winfield Scott today on the anniversary of his stunning victory at Chippawa and may Americans resolve this day to remember that to be independent for Life, Liberty and Pursuits of Happiness, the battle against tyranny is never fully secure unless one maintains a national defense that deters aggressors and a will to use it against those that are not deterred.

And would it be too much to ask that our government take care of the health and other needs of our veterans? I don’t think so.

“One man with courage makes a majority.” – Andrew Jackson

June 2017
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