Vision, Mission, and Strategy


Hillbilly Politics

South Carolina

palmetto-on-flag-jpgBy all means remove the Confederate flag from the South Carolina State House de facto outdoor museum grounds, if for no other reason than to see what totem will be the next device used by Democrats to try and paint Republicans as racist per se and themselves as paragons of racial virtue.

This native gamecock of South Carolina’s first thought after first hearing of the Charleston Church Shooting was my recent debate with death penalty opponents, most of whom were Democrats and many of whom were South Carolinians, in which I advocated for capital punishment only in rare heinous cases. I had hoped that the first reaction from liberal Democrat death penalty absolutists would be to re-visit their absolutism.

But no, the first priority of too many Democrats upon learning last Wednesday that Dylann Roof had murdered nine members of Charleston, South Carolina’s historic Emmanuel AME Church, was to re-visit the A.D. 2000 compromise signed off on by all parties and races, which removed the Confederate Flag from a position of sovereignty atop the State House Dome to the grounds next to its Confederate Memorial. Continue reading

southeast-auto-manufacturingFort Sumter was not hurled by Union soldiers serving under Major Robert Anderson across Charleston Harbor into inchoate cannon balls still in the cannons of Citadel-manned troops under the command of Confederate Brigadier General P.G.T. Beauregard located at Forts Johnson and Moultrie on James and Sullivan’s Islands, respectively, in South Carolina.

No, the War Between the States begun at 4:30 a.m. on April 12, 1861 was initiated by Southern aggression, despite the appellation for the Civil War preferred by Lost Causers as, the War of Northern Aggression.

But the war that has been waged against the eleven states that seceded and several other south of the Mason-Dixon line at least since five minutes after its native son, yet still a Democrat, Bill Clinton evacuated the White House just after High Noon on January 20, 2001, has been one born of Northern and West Coast aggression. What on God’s Green Earth is this South Carolina Gamecock presently roosted atop Stone Mountain of Georgia talking about?

The latest battle in the Yankees’ aka Liberal Democrats’ unrelenting attack against Southern voters refusing to give them electoral votes for Obamacare, higher energy and food prices and appeasement of Islamist terrorists was initiated by the Washington Post in the wee hours of October 7, 2014 with the following salvo, i.e. Why the South is the worst place to live in the U.S. – in 10 charts.

In his treasonous diatribe, a Wonkblog spy operating as Roberto A. Ferdman (notice the lack of creativity in the creation of aliases?) constructs ten supposed Southern strawmen and proceeds to destroy them with exaggerations, false assumptions, hasty generalizations, false dichotomies, post hoc and ad hoc non-arguments, reverse burdens of proof, non sequiturs and begged questions. Continue reading

Contrary to the tunnel vision one-note wonders of sports talk media, it wasn’t the Marcus Lattimores and/or Jadeveon Clowneys that defeated their SEC rival Georgia the last three years and their in-state arch rival Clemson for the last four years. No, it was The USC, founded 1801, Fighting Gamecocks.

USC

That’s right, not the Bush Heisman-forfeiting, perennially-on-probation, 1880-founded prophylactic-Southern Cal Trojan brand of whippersnappers that gave us The Juice (before he retired from The Bills to take up murder in L.A.). Rather, it was the Steve Spurrier-coached Palmetto State variety that has gone 11-2 the past two seasons despite annual injuries to the now NFL draft-departed Lattimore; and who also defeated their Tar Heel border-rivals in last week’s season opener despite a mostly sickening performance from their gastronomically-challenged Clowney that Dawgs Coach Mark Richt declared the best football player on Planet Earth (no apologies to Adrian Peterson or J.J. Watt).

Who knew that my Carolina Gamecocks had, not just another defensive end, but at least nine other players who could tackle Research Triangles despite the tar on their heels? Continue reading

If only Democrats celebrated non-government, non-union and non-Obama-crony labor on non-Labor Days.

labor force participation rate 2007-2013

Five Labor Days after the housing bubble burst in the Fall of 2008 and Democrats’ February 2009 passage of President Barack Hussein Obama’s signature American Recovery and Reinvestment (“stimulus”) Act, less Americans hold jobs this Labor Day than were employed when he was first inaugurated at Noon, January 20, 2009. Long-term unemployment remains the highest since WWII, U-6 underemployment rates remain at Great Depression era levels and the highest percentage of jobs today are part-time than at any time in U.S. history. Continue reading

Civil rights hero and long-time Democrat elected to represent the City of Atlanta in the U.S. House, Rep. John Lewis says he is “still” Marching on Washington, 50 years later. On Wednesday’s 50th anniversary, the first African-American President of the United States will commemorate the historic event with remarks from the same spot at the Lincoln Memorial where black baptist Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his “I Have a Dream” speech.

1963_March_on_Washington

But the District of Columbia and nation President Obama will look out upon on August 18, 2013 bears no resemblance to the “Southern” city of Washington and country MLK addressed five decades ago.

In South Carolina, the great-grandchildren of the authors of secession and Fort Sumter (including their Democrat Governor Ernest Hollings) had only recently raised the Confederate battle flag atop its State House to protest school desegregation orders issued by federal courts. But after King’s speech inspired Democrat President Lyndon Johnson to give up his previous opposition and join Republicans in Congress to pass the Civil Rights and Voting Rights Acts, de jure racial discrimination by government against blacks eventually came to an end. Continue reading

S.C. tea partier diversity makes mockery of President Obama and Democratic Party’s alleged reasons for existence

The first female Indian-American governor in U.S. history today appointed the first African-American U.S. Senator in South Carolina history. Governor Nikki Haley’s appointment of the Palmetto State congressman that defeated the son of the state’s legendary Strom Thurmond in an 80%+ white district will make Tim Scott the only Black member of the U.S. Senate when it convenes in January.

That’s enough obeisance to the Mainstream media/Democratic Party myths concerning endemic Southern white tea partier racism and the supposed demographic problem of the Republican Party that prevented them from defeating Barack Obama in the Election of 2012. Let’ get to what really matters about today’s historic act:

Haley introduced Scott by saying no one could fill DeMint’s shoes, but appointing a trailblazer like Scott could show that it was a new day in South Carolina.

“The entire state understands this is the right U.S. senator,” said Haley, who became South Carolina’s first female governor in 2010.

Scott grew up in poverty in North Charleston. His parents divorced when he was 7, and he remembered his mom working 16 hours a day to support him and his brother. Scott, who is single, introduced his mother at the beginning of his speech.

But growing up with a single mother wasn’t always easy, Scott said. In high school, he was in danger of flunking out until he met the late John Moniz, a conservative entrepreneur who ran a Chick-fil-A beside the movie theater where Scott worked.

They became friends and Scott said Moniz taught him important values, like how enlightened self-interest requires giving first before reaping the reward of receiving and how growing the value of how you see yourself will make you look more important in other people’s eyes.

Scott would go on to get a degree in political science from Charleston Southern University, which is affiliated with the South Carolina Baptist Convention and touts how it integrates faith into learning and serving.

Scott said he wouldn’t have agreed to be a U.S. senator if he didn’t think he could make a difference.

“The future is incredibly bright for America,” Scott said. “We have our challenges and we have things to overcome, but boy, does the future look bright in South Carolina.”

The major influences in Scott’s life: Hard working mother, a Chick-fil-A conservative entrepreneur, and Southern Baptists.  Not one mention of Jesse Jackson, Al Sharpton or South Carolina’s Democratic Party race-baiting Congressman Jim Clyburn.

Continue reading

Sen. Jim DeMint’s resignation to accept the presidency of the Heritage Foundation opens the door for Palmetto State Governor to appoint Rep. Tim Scott to replace him replacement in January.

Soon after President Barack Obama was re-elected, prominent liberals denounced those that voted against him as racist by comparing the red state/blue state divide on the electoral map of the Election of 2012 with the Union blue state/Confederacy grey state map of the 1861-1865 War Between the States. That war started when rebel forces surrounding Charleston Harbor fired on U.S. Army forces under siege at Fort Sumter.

Seven score and five years after Appomattox, the congressional district serving Charleston elected a black man to represent them in the U.S. House of Representatives instead of the son of the most prominent politician in the state’s history, Strom Thurmond.

Tim Scott, re-elected in 2012, has served the First Congressional District with tea partier distinction. His availability for an historic appointment gives his South Carolina Republican Party colleague and first Indian-American woman to be elected governor of a state in the U.S. a chance to strike a major blow against the Democratic Party/Media narrative blaming Mitt Romney’s defeat on supposed GOP hostility to minorities.

The district Rep. Scott has won twice with over 65% of vote is over 80% white.

Governor Haley, vote Scott in 2013!

Mike DeVine

“One man with courage makes a majority.” – Andrew Jackson

Editor – Hillbilly Politics

Co-Founder and Editor – Political Daily

Atlanta Law & Politics columnist – Examiner.com

 

First, let me say that I don’t have a favorite among those left. I don’t like any of them much at all. However, I have noticed a tendency in voters to forgive some character flaws over others.

Newt Gingrich comes with a lot of baggage. Everybody knows it. It has been aired for a number of years. Yet, people can’t forgive him even when he asks for forgiveness. The thing they can’t seem to forgive is his multiple marraiges. That’s okay, but it’s not the only character flaw that determines if a person will stay true to his word in other matters.

Mitt Romney has a lot of baggage; more than people realize along with a ruthlessness about how he deals with competition that looks like it might win over him. Not mention his perpetual campaign that began in 2007 and has not ceased since.  In addition to that ruthlessness, he can’t seem to stay on one side of an issue; any issue. Some call him the Flipper but it’s worse than that. He often reminds me of those blow bop dolls that kids like to punch. The doll reels backward, forward, and to the sides before it finally rights itself, ready for the next punch only to repeat the cycle. Once we can finally sort out where he actually stands on an issue, there is still his ruthlessness against his opponents to consider. Remember Fred Thompson? Here’s what the Romney camp for 08 did to Fred Thompson, in Thompson’s own words:

[…] Days after I got into the presidential race in 2007, I was greeted with a website, “PhoneyFred.org,” described in the media at the time as an “anti Fred Thompson smear site.” You couldn’t really tell who was behind it, but we learned of it from the Democratic National Committee, which made ample use of it. We assumed that they had created it. However, a reporter at the Washington Post (of all people) decided to find out who was behind the site. After a lot of effort, she traced it to an executive of TTS Strategies, a South Carolina consulting firm run by J. Warren Tompkins, one of the most notorious hardball political operatives in the country.

Politicians of opposing campaigns were known to get the “Warren Treatment.” He ran Bush’s 1980 campaign, in which anonymous flyers and telephone calls accused John McCain of fathering an illegitimate black child.

In 2007, he was running Mitt Romney’s campaign in South Carolina, where Mitt was behind the rest of us in the polls. Of course, when confronted, both Tompkins and Mitt were “shocked” to learn that a rogue employee (who ran Tompkins’s office) was running such a website (out of the office), and the site was taken down immediately. One of the more benign and amusing things the site accused me of was being a “flip flopper.” I kid you not. […]

 

Do read the rest of the article. The part quoted is near the end of the article which is mainly about Herman Cain. Like Fred, I don’t know if Romney’s campaign was behind the torpedoing of Cain(whom I did support) but it does remind one of what Romney is capable of. Now that Gingrich has somewhat burst Romney’s bubble of inevitablitiy, it will be interesting going forward.

By the way, Santorum has a lot of baggage, too. Google Santorum scandals and you’ll see. I won’t spend a lot of time on him because he doesn’t seem to be getting much traction after Iowa. So does Ron Paul. Google him, too.

It does remind one of the old cliche about living in glass houses and throwing stones.

But character flaws should be expected. These men are only human, after all. There is no perfect human being save one who died for our sins and sins we still commit. Depending on our worldview some sins are worse than others, though God nor Christ ever differentiated between one or another.

Fred’s article about Cain does make one wonder about things when Romney chose the very same firm that torpedoed Fred to manage his campaign again this time around (emphasis mine).

[…]”We knew coming here that Romney would have a bull’s-eye on his back but now it’s the size of the Target sign,” said J. Warren Tompkins, a South Carolina GOP strategist advising Romney’s campaign. “You’ve got to worry about that. We’ve got to survive here, but if you do the probability of getting the nomination is pretty good.” […]

I’m not exactly advocating for either Gingrich, Paul, or Santorum over Romney but neither am I discounting them just because the media wants Romney. Given that the ‘inevitability bubble’ has burst, this primary season could get real interesting if we stop this selective forgiveness some their transgressions while beating up others for theirs. Hopefully, if we can manage to do that, we can have the least of the leasser evils that have been foisted upon us.

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