Vision, Mission, and Strategy


Hillbilly Politics

Civil War

harf and shermanPresident Barack Obama via his State Department’s Marie Harf said, earlier this week, that the United States “cannot win this war by killing [Islamic State fighters] . . . [and that] we need, in the medium- to longer-term, to go after the root causes that lead people to join these groups, whether it’s lack of opportunity for jobs, whether . . .”

One hundred and fifty years ago today, Union Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman left Columbia, S.C. in ruins after having killed enough Confederate rebels in the Palmetto State and Georgia to ensure eventual victory in the War Between the States. Sherman understood the root causes of pride, arrogance, greed and slavery, i.e. sin, and that killing enough of the “causers”, in their heretofore untouched antebellum paradise, would tear out the roots for generations.

German Nazis and Imperial Japanese had their root causes torn out via just enough killing by FDR’s Patton and HST’s Enola Gay. Yes, Ms. Harf, after the killing there may be time to deal with root causes in a non-violent way with Marshall Plans or MacArthur viceroys, but only after enough enemies are dead so as to concentrate the minds and hearts of the survivors.

In fact, Marie’s boss Barack inherited a root cause-prevention device in Iraq when he took office in 2009. President George W. Bush, after staying the course there and overcoming the Democrat enemy’s “Bush-Lied” campaign in the homeland, surged to victory over al Qaeda and Saddam’s Baathists, with the aid of freedom-seeking Iraqis, by killing tens of thousands of those that had been trained to wage jihad over here, before we put at risk their homeland over there. In the process, we gathered intel via waterboarding and by having stayed the course and earning the trust of Muslim informers – which led, ironically,  to President Obama’s only finest moment, i.e. the killing of Usama bin Laden after Obama had opposed the surge and waterboarding, or as I like to call it, nose-swabbing. Continue reading

southeast-auto-manufacturingFort Sumter was not hurled by Union soldiers serving under Major Robert Anderson across Charleston Harbor into inchoate cannon balls still in the cannons of Citadel-manned troops under the command of Confederate Brigadier General P.G.T. Beauregard located at Forts Johnson and Moultrie on James and Sullivan’s Islands, respectively, in South Carolina.

No, the War Between the States begun at 4:30 a.m. on April 12, 1861 was initiated by Southern aggression, despite the appellation for the Civil War preferred by Lost Causers as, the War of Northern Aggression.

But the war that has been waged against the eleven states that seceded and several other south of the Mason-Dixon line at least since five minutes after its native son, yet still a Democrat, Bill Clinton evacuated the White House just after High Noon on January 20, 2001, has been one born of Northern and West Coast aggression. What on God’s Green Earth is this South Carolina Gamecock presently roosted atop Stone Mountain of Georgia talking about?

The latest battle in the Yankees’ aka Liberal Democrats’ unrelenting attack against Southern voters refusing to give them electoral votes for Obamacare, higher energy and food prices and appeasement of Islamist terrorists was initiated by the Washington Post in the wee hours of October 7, 2014 with the following salvo, i.e. Why the South is the worst place to live in the U.S. – in 10 charts.

In his treasonous diatribe, a Wonkblog spy operating as Roberto A. Ferdman (notice the lack of creativity in the creation of aliases?) constructs ten supposed Southern strawmen and proceeds to destroy them with exaggerations, false assumptions, hasty generalizations, false dichotomies, post hoc and ad hoc non-arguments, reverse burdens of proof, non sequiturs and begged questions. Continue reading

Winfield_Scott,_ca._War_of_1812

Two hundred and thirty-eight years ago yesterday, the Continental Congress approved the text of the Declaration of Independence to formalize their unanimous vote of July 2, 1776 to declare independence from, and thus wage war against, the British Empire. Shots fired at Lexington, Concord and Bunker and Breed’s Hills had already been heard around the world in 1775 announcing the waging of the then undeclared war. It would be weeks after that first Fourth of July before many signatures other than John Hancock’s adorned later versions of the Declaration, six years before the British Army would surrender at Yorktown and eight before the Treaty of Paris officially ended the American Revolutionary War, proper.

But had actual independence truly been attained even when the ink was dry on that 1783 treaty or even by the time the Constitution of the United States was ratified in 1789? Not if you asked U.S. Navy sailors impressed by British officers into Her Majesty’s Service at sea or exporters, from harbors on the Great Lakes or out of Charleston, South Carolina, unable to market their wares abroad thanks to that same navy flying the Union Jack.

Thus, the War of 1812 and the entry into the American bloodstream of Winfield Scott, a son of Virginia, but first and foremost an American, whose first foray into the history books was in the struggle to secure the Niagara River and thus Lakes Ontario and Erie from British control. Thwarted by inept superiors at Queenston in October of 1812, then Colonel Scott’s ingenious plan to secure Fort George was allowed to go forward in May of 2013. Then on July 5, 1814 he took Chippawa, and later that month Lundy’s Lane, to secure the river and Upper New York independent of all but the will of Americans.

Partially inspired by his exploits, Dolly and President James Madison would remain calm, after the same inept commanders that first thwarted Scott allowed Washington City to be taken and the U.S. Capitol and White (then President’s) House burned, to, together with newly appointed Secretary of War James Monroe unleash General Andrew Jackson and others to drive the enemy from the shores of the Land of the Free and the Home of the Brave with only a Star-Spangled Banner flying above it.

Fast forward to the Halls of Montezuma in September of 1847 and witness now General Scott accept the formal surrender of Mexico in Mexico City and the completion of a manifest destiny of Liberty from the Atlantic sea to the Pacific sea. By the time war broke out between the states between those shining seas, Scott was deemed too old to command Union forces against the fellow Virginian, Robert E. Lee, whom he failed to persuade to eschew the Confederacy. But his last great legacy to secure true independence for all, even from slavery, was his “Anaconda Plan” that Commander in Chief Abraham Lincoln approved to take control of all harbors and major water ways from the Chesapeake; Outer North Carolina bank;, Port Royal in South Carolina; Pensacola, Florida; Mobile, Alabama; and to New Orleans and all points in between.

God bless Winfield Scott today on the anniversary of his stunning victory at Chippawa and may Americans resolve this day to remember that to be independent for Life, Liberty and Pursuits of Happiness, the battle against tyranny is never fully secure unless one maintains a national defense that deters aggressors and a will to use it against those that are not deterred.

And would it be too much to ask that our government take care of the health and other needs of our veterans? I don’t think so.

“One man with courage makes a majority.” – Andrew Jackson

big-shanty-stationOne Hundred and Fifty years ago this week my great-great-grandfather Lecil DeVine was shot in the face and captured by Union forces at Big Shanty, Georgia, a key rail station just north of Kennesaw Mountain and Marietta, while a confederate soldier defending against  General William Tecumseh Sherman’s inevitable capture of Atlanta in the Fall of 1864 that ensured President Abraham Lincoln’s re-election and the re-unification of all states in a new America free of slavery.

Lecil DeVine and his ancestors had loved America while eschewing slavery since they first arrived on its shores before the war for independence they fought in. Born in Spartanburg, South Carolina less then 80 miles from President Andrew Jackson’s Palmetto State birthplace at Lancaster, Lecil joined fellow Jacksonian Democrats in his new Alabama home to elect a unionist delegate to oppose secession at the early 1861 Montgomery state convention. Unlike President Jackson who threatened to invade and hang Nullification secessionists in his home state in the 1830s, DeVine and other like-minded Southern Americans failed to persuade a majority in eleven states to continue the formation of a more perfect union under the United States Constitution.

Thus defeated, Lecil watched the state-rights Confederacy effect the first draft of free individuals into involuntary military service in American history and the ridicule and shame heaped upon those that didn’t volunteer beforehand. Thus chastened before his inevitable conscription in April pursuant to the second such Act passed at President Jefferson Davis’s request by the CSA congress, he joined the 31st Alabama Infantry Regiment in March of 1862. After fighting in Tennessee, Lecil helped defend Port Gibson, Mississippi before enduring Grant’s siege of Vicksburg after which he was taken prisoner; paroled to Demopolis, Alabama and later exchanged with fellow Confederates for Union prisoners; before rejoining his regiment and his inevitable re-capture 20 miles north of Atlanta.

While Atlanta burned, DeVine was imprisoned at the federal Rock Island, Illinois POW camp which, while not as notoriously wicked as the Andersonville one run by Confederates in Georgia, was known as one rife with hunger and disease. Even before the fall of Atlanta, war deprivations of food and shelter in much of Dixie were stark, and afterwards much more so, including in Lecil’s northern Alabama home. Thus, with the war he wanted no part of obviously lost by the Confederacy and his patriotic duty fulfilled, he “swallowed the dog” by pledging his Oath of Allegiance to the United States of America and enlisted for a year of frontier service in the U.S. Army. Ironically, his Oath and enlistment papers were signed by Major H.B. Rathbone who, with his wife, accompanied President and Mrs. Lincoln on that fateful night to come at Ford’s Theater.

Lincoln died to preserve the last best hope of man on Earth. Lecil DeVine, rather than wallow in decades of “Lost Cause” bemoanings, embraced that new hope that had been his first cause and pursued the American Dream through family and enterprise in a South though ravaged by war and an imperfect reconstruction, was at least purged of the evil institution of slavery and with an amended Constitution better dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.

Lecil DeVine’s successors in this Spartanburg native’s immediate family would help build a New South of industry in railroads and nuclear power; integrated schools, Little Leagues and Cub Scouts; law, faith, education and good humor. None of which would have been possible absent the sacrifices of great-great-grandfather Lecil.

So as this Carolina Gamecock now roosted atop Stone Mountain of Georgia and my fellow Atlantans approach the Sesquicentennial of the burning of our great city by who Decatur’s Mary A.H. Gay called America’s Nero; let us remember than unlike Nero’s Rome, Sherman’s Atlanta and America rose from its ashes united to free half the world from Nazis and an evil communist empire and our own empire from Jim Crow.

God’s not finished with America yet and I thank God for a reluctant Confederate ancestor who never lost sight of the City on the Hill that he wanted for himself and his family.

“One man with courage makes a majority.” – Andrew Jackson

June 2017
S M T W T F S
« May    
 123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
252627282930  


    


Copyright © 2012 Hillbilly Politics. All Rights Reserved.